Why I am excited about Unity in 2018

by Miguel de Icaza

While I had promised my friend Lucas that I would build a game in Unity for what seems like a decade, I still have not managed to build one.

Recently Aras shared his excitement for Unity in 2018. There is a ton on that blog post to unpack.

What I am personally excited about is that Unity now ships an up-to-date Mono in the core.

Jonathan Chambers and his team of amazing low-level VM hackers have been hard at work in upgrading Unity's VM and libraries to bring you the latest and greatest Mono runtime to Unity. We have had the privilege of assisting in this migration and providing them with technical support for this migration.

The work that the Unity team has done lays down the foundation for an ongoing update to their .NET capabilities, so future innovation on the platform can be quickly adopted, bringing new and more joyful capabilities to developers in the platform.

With this new runtime, Unity developers will be able to access and consume a large portion of third party .NET libraries, including all those shiny .NET Standard Libraries - the new universal way of sharing code in the .NET world.

C# 7

The Unity team has also provided very valuable guidance to the C# team which have directly influenced features in C# 7 like ref locals and returns - In our own tests using C# for an AR application, we doubled the speed of managed-code AR processing by using these new features.

When users use the new Mono support in Unity, they default to C# 6, as this is the version that Mono's C# compiler fully supports. One of the challenges is that Mono's C# compiler has not fully implemented support for C# 7, as Mono itself moved to Roslyn.

The team at Unity is now working with the Roslyn team to adopt the Roslyn C# compiler in Unity. Because Roslyn is a larger compiler, it is a slower compiler to startup, and Unity does many small incremental compilations. So the team is working towards adopting the server compilation mode of Roslyn. This runs the Roslyn C# compiler as a reusable service which can compile code very quickly, without having to pay the price for startup every time.

Visual Studio

If you install the Unity beta today, you will also see that on Mac, it now defaults to Visual Studio for Mac as its default editor.

JB evain leads our Unity support for Visual Studio and he has brought the magic of his Unity plugin to Visual Studio for Mac.

As Unity upgrades its Mono runtime, they also benefit from the extended debugger protocol support in Mono, which bring years of improvements to the debugging experience.

Posted on 20 Feb 2018