Developing Cross Platform application with MonoDevelop

Yesterday Lluis announced the last missing piece from our strategy to make MonoDevelop a full cross-platform IDE: MonoDevelop now runs on Windows as well:

When we started the planning for MonoDevelop 2.2, the major goal of that release was to get feature parity on Linux, MacOS and Windows.

We want to grow the community of developers that contribute to MonoDevelop and we wanted to attract add-in developers that wanted to bring their IDE extensions to all three platforms.

MonoDevelop has recently been getting some nice community contributed plugins like Flash/Flex development support, Vala language support, Mono debugger for OSX (thanks to the nice folks at Unity for this!), VI editing mode and of course our own Silverlight and ASP.NET MVC add-ins.

My theory is that supporting MonoDevelop on all the three major operating systems will have a multiplication effect in terms of contributions to MonoDevelop: it will help both users and will enable developers that extend MonoDevelop with add-ins to reach more users.

I secretly want Unity to adopt MonoDevelop as the code editor for Unity; for the FlashDevelop guys on Windows to adopt MonoDevelop as their cross-platform foundation (their users want a cross platform Flashdevelop); for Flashbang to bring their UnityScript framework to MonoDevelop

Developing an add-in for MonoDevelop now brings your enhancements to a much larger community.

Look and Feel

Although the IDE is built using Gtk#, but we are aware that developers want to get things integrated with their operating system as much as possible. This is why we have invested in properly integrating MonoDevelop with the Mac and Windows.

The Look of MonoDevelop still has a heavy feel of the Linux Gtk+, but we are bluring the lines by making the theme and style match the operating system. Development in Gtk native themes will also continue to improve things.

Feel wise, we make MonoDevelop follow the conventions of the host platform. For example, on the Mac, MonoDevelop uses the Mac system menu, it uses an entirely different keybinding style that follows what every Mac developer expects (Command-KEY operations that match X-Code for example) and even text selection in the editor behaves differently:

More work will come, because we want MonoDevelop to feel native on each platform.

On Windows for example, MonoDevelop runs on top of the .NET Framework and uses the .NET managed debugger instead of using Mono's runtime and Mono's debugger, so there is no dependency on Mono to be installed on the system.

Posted on 04 Jun 2009 by Miguel de Icaza
This is a personal web page. Things said here do not represent the position of my employer.